Happy 2014 to You and Yours!!

2013 has been a year that has changed my life forever. Magical and brutal. I learned far more than I taught. I recieved far more than I gave. For every highlight, many bruises. Each bruise a very real blessing. Looking forward to 2014, I gave myself only two concrete goals: 1) To find a permanent teaching position at a University. 2) Learn to let go. In truth, I worry about making any resolutions at all. This time last year I promised myself I would not fill my plate with so many projects and responsibilities, but looking back I realize how laughable that is. Here is a shortlist of some things I was involved with this past year:

1) Began an effort to raise $10,000 for a memorial headstone, which included letter writing and organizing a benefit concert
2) Released two books
3) Traveled to approximately 17 cities across the U.S. promoting both books
4) Facilitated approximately 22 interviews around the plane crash book project, including one fortunate interview with Pete Seeger (click here for archived blog post on this)
5) Attended Bea Franco’s funeral service only two weeks after she held a copy of Mañana Means Heaven in her hands (click here for archived blog post on this)
6) Met with the Woody Guthrie Center archivist regarding my research around the plane crash
7) Became a mentor for Prescott College’s low res MFA program
8) Wrote two grants to help fund this work (received none)
9) Taught poetry to local teens at Boulder High School
10) Wrote external reviews for three publishers
11) Transferred both of my children to a new school
12) Made a long overdue and vital reconnection with family
13) Found myself constantly asking, “How did I end up here?”

As the new year begins, I have been meditating on this photo. Mostly because it recently re-emerged in our family a few weeks ago. It was taken in the fields of Wyoming in 1974, the year I was born. I am on my father’s back while he and my mother are working. They were only 20 years old at the time. Neither had ever made it past the 9th grade. They were young and scared, but driven by fierce ambition. I like to think that while they were looking forward, into the future, I was there, bound to them, with my eyes on the past. And it only occurs to me now, as I write this, that maybe this is how I “ended up here.”

Peace to you all in this coming year. Let us continue the work of strengthening our ties, through art, dance, poetry, music, and the sharing of stories!

You can contact me at: tzhernandez@yahoo.com

Mañana Means Heaven Blog Tour Kicks Off

Dear Friends,

The “Mañana Means Heaven Blog Tour” kicks off this Monday with a great interview by Kerouac scholar and author, Stephanie Nikolopoulos. Starting Monday, six different blog sights (see links below) will be posting interviews, excerpts, never before seen photos of Bea Franco, audio clips and other cool tidbits about the book over six days. This is an opportunity to learn more about Bea Franco, and get access to material that was not included in the book.

Manana Means Heaven Blog Tour:

Monday, September 16 | Stephanie Nikolopoulos, http://stephanienikolopoulos.com/blog/
Tuesday, September 17 | The Daily Beat, http://thedailybeatblog.blogspot.com/
Wednesday, September 18 | La Bloga, http://labloga.blogspot.com/
Thursday, September 19 | The Big Idea, http://www.jasonfmcdaniel.com/
Friday, September 20 | The Dan O’Brien Project http://thedanobrienproject.blogspot.com/
Saturday, September 21 | Impressions of a Reader http://www.impressionsofareader.com/

Book Tour & Readings

FYI, the east coast leg of the book tour begins as of next Wednesday, September 18 in Easthampton, Mass. After that I go to NY for the book release party at La Casa Azul Bookstore, and then on to the Brooklyn Book Festival. Please click here for all dates and details. Thanks again for supporting and I hope to see you at these events!

MMHBook Cover

Finding Bea Franco: Journal Entry #22

The following is taken from one of the journals I kept during my search for Bea Franco. This is probably the first entry when the idea of locating her began to feel like a real possibility, and less like a waste of time. Or as one biographer put it, “Good luck. Looking for her is like trying to find the ghost of a needle in a haystack.”

————–

Friday, August 7, 2009

Last week I had dinner at my mother-in-laws house, and her friend Vicky, who happens to own a small farm in Selma, was there too. I asked her if she knew any Francos. She shook her head but replied, “There are only two Franco families in Selma, so it’s got to be one of them.” I asked her if she knew where the old Selma Winery was and if it was still around. She told me it was behind her house, the same place where the labor camp was once located. Days later, on my way to a Dr.’s visit (I intentionally found a Doctor in Selma so that whenever I’d have to make an appointment—and take time off work to do this—I could spend at least an hour poking around there. Of course one hour has a way of turning into two or three), I drove out there, and actually found the place. I remembered being on those back roads as a kid, in the bed of my grandfather’s pick up truck, staring out at the miles and miles of grapefields. It was familiar.

The Winery sat abandoned and tattered in the countryside, surrounded by fields in all directions. Dust clouded around it and tumbleweeds collected against a warped fence that was put up to keep trespassers out. A tall pine tree stood in front, its roots reaching toward a nearby irrigation ditch. The aluminum siding was flaking off the old structure and graffiti ruled everything. High above, at the tip of the tallest point, in weathered black paint in read: SELMA WINERY. But it looked as if something else was painted over that, another word, I couldn’t tell. Pigeons roosted in the dark corners. Oxidized orange spilled over all sides of the walls and support beams. A slab of concrete with spider-breaks and gouged chunks rolled out toward the dirt path.

I stood next to my parked car, along the irrigation ditch, and gazed quietly over the details of what once was, paying careful attention to the ghosts. Only a hot breeze rustled the loose edge of a fallen sheet of siding, and a few sycamore leaves skipped past. I got back in my car and drove around the perimeter. The fence blocked off the main road, but nearby was a dirt bridge with a private road sign riddled with shotgun pellet holes. The road lead to a line of wilted houses and crooked trailer homes, old car parts and piles of junk adorned the yards. I drove over the bridge and followed the dirt road, slowly passing the houses and barking dogs. A woman peeked out from behind a curtain and eyed me curiously. I parked close to the Winery, down in the bed of where the Kings River once ran. It was the same cradle used as the natural boundary line, where once field hands and Winery workers could pitch their tents and live out the season. I imagined it must’ve been the spot where Bea and Jack lived together during that short Fall in October of 1947. Now the land was stricken yellow with nothing but an old discarded couch and a nest of field mice. I hadn’t noticed but a few men had gathered across the dirt road and were staring at me. They leaned against the back of a pick up truck and smoked cigarettes and stood silently. I nodded at them. A small dog sidled up to one of their legs and got nudged away with the tip of a boot. The dog cowered and began making its way toward me. I walked back to my car and got in, then turned the ignition on and ambled up the dirt road. The men turned their heads, eyes followed me, until I was back on the road and out of sight. 

Below is one of several photos I took of the old Selma Winery in 2009. I believe it has since been demolished.

 

Tim Z. Hernandez©

Fall is an Auspicious Month

Today is Sunday, and I am writing this on the occasion of Bea Franco’s 93rd birthday. I would’ve forgotten this entirely had it not been for the fact that just this morning I was putting some final touches on my manuscript, Mañana Means Heaven. Coincidentally, I was working on the Afterword, and it was a scene that took place on her birthday.

I really think Fall is Bea’s season. Consider the following: she was born in the Fall of 1920. Her tryst with Jack happened in Fall of 1947. On the day I first walked up the cold steps of her porch, it was Fall of 2010. My book will hit shelves in Fall of 2013.       

On another note, last week I was at the Boulder Bookstore and I came across the newly released book, The Voice Is All: The Lonely Victory of Jack Kerouac, by Joyce Johnson, who was once Kerouac’s girlfriend. I was pleased to read the following excerpt:  

          When it appeared in the Paris Review in 1956, “The Mexican Girl” would change

          Jack’s luck and result in On the Road finally getting published. I wonder how long

          it took for Bea Franco to find out Jack had written about her…

                    The Greyhound bus station in Bakersfield, where Bea and Jack met.

The Fiction of Bea Franco…

I didn’t start out looking to find Bea Franco. When the initial idea came to me, it was to write a fictional account of Bea’s side of the story, the fifteen days she spent with Jack Kerouac from her point of view. I figured it would be a worthwhile attempt, since I grew up in the San Joaquin Valley, and my own family knew the labor camps and fields so well. I pictured Bea as my grandmother, Estela Constante Hernandez. The woman I knew who would get up at 4 o’clock each morning to make homemade tortillas and burritos for the family, as they set out for the fields. The same grandmother who used to feed us cigarette ashes as children, claiming it would “clean us out.” A hard scrabble woman with a big heart and calloused hands.

This was the original idea anyway. I began my research by looking for mention of Bea Franco in other books, biographies mostly. I stopped counting after around two dozen. I quickly discovered the information on her was pretty limited, and many were rehashing the same thing. Shortly after, I discovered some of her letters were housed in the New York Public Library’s Berg Collection/ Kerouac Archives. This is where my book took off…

 Image

 

Here is a sampling of only some of the books that mention Bea Franco: 

Kerouac’s American Journey by Paul Maher Jr.

Subterranean Kerouac by Ellis Amburn

Memory Babe by Gerald Nicosia

This is The Beat Generation by James Campbell

Why Kerouac Matters by John Leland

Jack’s Book by Barry Gifford and Lawrence Lee

Women of the Beat Generation by Brenda Knight

The Beat Face of God by Stephen D. Edington

Manly Love by Bill Morgan and David Stanford

Countering the Counterculture by Manuel Luis Martinez

Kerouac’s Duluoz Legend by James T. Jones

Kerouac: The Definitive Biography by Paul Maher Jr.

Jack Kerouac: A Biography by Michael J. Dittman

Historical Dictionary of the Beat Movement by Paul Varner

Best American Short Stories 1956

Still Wild: Short Fiction of the American West by Larry McMurtry

Neal Cassady: Fast Life of a Beat Hero by David Sandison and Graham Vickers

The Voice Is All by Joyce Johnson

On the Road: The Original Scroll by Jack Kerouac

Windblown World: The Journals of Jack Kerouac by Douglas Brinkley

Book of Dreams by Jack Kerouac